TITANIC-TITANIC.com | Titanic Articles: Iwan Davies: Harland and Wolff Visit

The photographs on this page were taken by website and forum regular Iwan Davies, who has very generously contributed the photographs to the site for others to see and enjoy after his visit to Harland and Wolff in 2008.

All photographs are © Iwan Davies, and may not be used without his express permission

 

Copyright Iwan Davies

This is the North end of the Thompson graving dock looking south over the Thompson pumping house. At the bottom of the picture a small figure can be seen that has been placed in the dock for scale.

Copyright Iwan Davies
The Thompson graving dock is 850ft long with the door at its inner (current) position, too short for the Olympics. So to accommodate them the door can be moved to the outer position seen here to lengthen the dock by 37.5ft.
Copyright Iwan Davies
The graving dock caisson (door).
Copyright Iwan Davies
As above.
Copyright Iwan Davies
A close up of the figure placed in the dock and the keel blocks on which Titanic would have rested once the dock was drained.
Copyright Iwan Davies
One of the many information posts placed around the dock showing where, if Titanic were in the dock today, you would be standing relative to it.
Copyright Iwan Davies
Close up of the components making up a Keel block.

Copyright Iwan Davies

Looking down into the dock

Copyright Iwan Davies
As above.
Copyright Iwan Davies
Front view of the dock showing the original bollard to which the Titanic would be tied when she entered the water.
Copyright Iwan Davies
Another view of the Thompson pump house.
Copyright Iwan Davies
Some of the remaining railway lines that were used to move equipment around the island.
Copyright Iwan Davies
Front shot of the HMS Caroline in the Alexandra dock. The last surviving battleship from WW1 she is currently used as a training ship, although minus her guns and engines.
Copyright Iwan Davies
As above.
Copyright Iwan Davies
The H&W main offices, the sole H&W building left standing from 1912. The famous drawing offices are behind this.
Copyright Iwan Davies

One of the huge H&W cranes, Goliath. Weighing in at over 4000 tonnes.

Copyright Iwan Davies

Standing at the southern tip of the Abercorn basin, looking at slipways 5&6.

Copyright Iwan Davies

A nice profile view of the Nomadic, currently being restored.

Copyright Iwan Davies

From the water, a rear view of the HMS Caroline.

Copyright Iwan Davies

And the Thompson pump house.
Copyright Iwan Davies
The cruise liner Balmoral, tied up on the West side of the Lagan
Copyright Iwan Davies
The HMS Caroline
Copyright Iwan Davies
Some of the remaining cranes from the yard (built in the 1940’s), these are scheduled for renovation.

Copyright Iwan Davies

Looking onto the Titanic and Olympic slipways
Copyright Iwan Davies
Looking North into the River Lagan, the very spot the Titanic floated for the first time.
Copyright Iwan Davies
The Olympic slipway
Copyright Iwan Davies
The Titanic slipway
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A side profile of the two slipways, where the Arrol gantry once stood
Copyright Iwan Davies
Looking into the Abercorn basin, visible are the new apartments being built and the two cranes Samson & Goliath.
Copyright Iwan Davies
Some of the information on the walls of the Donegall quay.
Copyright Iwan Davies
.The stern of the Nomadic.
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The Nomadic in the Barnett Dock.
Copyright Iwan Davies
As above.
Copyright Iwan Davies
One of two dry docks in the Clarendon dock, the pump house separating them is visible to the right.
Copyright Iwan Davies
More information on the Donegall quay.
Copyright Iwan Davies
This is actually the Robinson-Cleaver building in Belfast, which I mistook for the Ulster reform club mentioned in many Titanic books. But it is very similar.
Copyright Iwan Davies
Frontal view of the Thompson Graving Dock, I stood on the bollard shown earlier to get this shot.
Copyright Iwan Davies
One of the notice board explaining the door positions of the dock.

 

All photographs are © Iwan Davies, and may not be used without his permission.

 

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